Part 2 Point Pelee

Part 2 Point Pelee National Park (Read Part 1) by Dave Cooper

From the tower near the marsh walk you can see the many Weeping Willow trees that grow thick on the eastern side of the point right next to the cattails that cover the swampy areas.

Also in this area are ponds with lily pads, which still look good even though autumn has now arrived.

On another path near the visitors centre we came across an old barn and a house that were built in the 1800s and people were still living here until 1969.

Here is one little friend, a Blue Heron that I found fishing for his lunch in a small stream near the boathouse. Herons are migratory birds; this one may end up in the Washington D.C. area, a common location for many of the long wingspan birds found here in Southern Ontario.

The Beach Walk along the west side of the point is 2.5 kilometers long and a suggested 30 minute walk, but for a photographer like me, who is always looking for that next photo opportunity, it usually takes four times as long. I found a nice Cactus patch growing along the beach. Below is a photo of one of the many healthy specimens.

I almost stepped on this little guy on my walk back to the parking lot at the visitors centre. I don’t think I have ever seen a two toned frog before. He blended in very well with the grass along the path. After a search on the website “naturewatch.ca” I find this type to be known as “Green Frogs” and he will find a shallow pond and hibernate until spring.

What is the point of not going to the most southerly point of mainland Canada and not having your photo taken? Here is Marjorie just after the last wave filled her shoes full of cold lake water!

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