Photo: Le Moose

Moose on the Loose – Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

I miss those days in the summer, when I had the time to settle in by a big bull moose and take pictures of him for 2 hours.

Oh well, something to look forward to next summer!

Photo: Moose on the Loose

In Grand Teton National Park, when I was there this summer, there were 2 very good looking bull moose that hung out in a swampy area right beside the main road in the park.

I spent hours upon hours there watching them and taking a billion photos at every angle possible. Here’s one of them in the process of standing up to go in search of some tasty tree leaves to munch on.

How Canadian….in Wyoming.

This guy was found munching away on leaves with his pal, another bull moose even bigger than him, in Grand Teton National Park.

The loud construction on the road about 20 feet away, and the crowd of 30-ish tourists didn’t seem to bother these dudes very much.

Hike #2 – Still in Grand Teton

I am very much looking forward to hiking in Grand Teton.

Last year, I missed out on any form of hiking as grizzly bear 399 and 610 kept my boyfriend and I occupied with our cameras snapping every 2 seconds. I have never taken so many photos in my life!

Hiking among the majestic Teton backdrop has been a dream, ever since I laid eyes on them one year ago.

Here is the description of the second hike I will attempt in Grand Teton, after the Pacific Creek trail:

Glade Creek (from the book Best Easy Hikes – Grand Teton, by Bill Schneider)

Description: A short, easy hike in the northernmost section of the park (7 miles round trip)

Trailhead: Hwy 89, 4.4 miles west of Flagg Ranch on the Grassy Lake Road (on the left).

The hike: Most people don’t think about this section of Grand Teton National Park, so pan on having Glade Creek and most of the north-trails section mostly to yourself. This hike actually starts outside the park in the John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway, a 24,000-acre area that is more wild than many parts of the park. The trailhead sign says that it’s 3.5 miles to the park boundary, but this is probably exaggerated by at least a half mile and perhaps more.

The trail starts out through a mature lodgepole forest. After about a mile and a half, you cross Glade Creek on a footbridge. Shortly thereafter, you drop down a fairly steep hill to a huge meadow. To the left, you can see the Snake River flowing into Jackson Lake and a huge freshwater marsh, one of two large freshwater marshes found in the park. You can also see Jackson Lake off to the south. This is a wildlife-rich area, so take your time before retracing your steps to the trailhead. You may be able to see some moose, swans, and other wildlife, especially in the early morning or near sunset. Even the mighty grizzly bear frequently roams through this rich habitat. But be forewarned. There is one wildlife species you will see and not enjoy. This is the only section of trail in the park where we had to stop and get out the mosquito repellent and netting.

Yikes. I loved the sound of this hike until the last few sentences. I will be sure to pile on the layers of clothing, bug spray and wear a mosquito net. HATE those little buggers!

Photo of the Day – Moooose!

Not the crispest photo I have taken, but this brings back memories from Kananaskis, Alberta last summer.

This shy little gal seemed so awkward and nervous every time my camera clicked. Those long gangly legs looked as though she would trip over her own hooves at any moment!

Can’t wait to see these silly creatures again this summer!

The countdown is ON!

Picture of the day – Moose in Kananaskis

I am Canadian! And I love my moose. Here is one gangly, adorable, yet very skiddish moose that I took over 100 pictures of, back in August this year.

If you ever have a desire to find moose, visit Kananaskis, Alberta. They are wobbling all over the place.